An In-depth Look Into Nation’s Submarine Strength


Last Updated: January 23, 2023, 11:27 IST

Mumbai: Mazagon Dock workers onboard the fifth Kalvari-class submarine 'Vagir' ahead of its commissioning ceremony, at the Naval base in Mumbai, Friday, Jan. 20, 2023. (PTI Photo/Shashank Parade)

Mumbai: Mazagon Dock workers onboard the fifth Kalvari-class submarine ‘Vagir’ ahead of its commissioning ceremony, at the Naval base in Mumbai, Friday, Jan. 20, 2023. (PTI Photo/Shashank Parade)

Explained: INS Vagir, commissioned today by the Indian Navy, boasts of some of the best sensors in the world

INS Vagir, the fifth submarine of the Kalvari Class submarines, was commissioned into the Indian Navy on Monday, giving a boost to the force’s prowess. INS Vagir, which has been built by Mazagon Dock Shipbuilders Limited here with technology transfer from France, was commissioned in a ceremony attended by Chief of Naval Staff Admiral R Hari Kumar.

“The submarine will boost the Indian Navy’s capability to further India’s maritime interests in deterring the enemy, and conducting Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) to provide decisive blow in the times of crisis,” the Navy said.

Mumbai: Naval officers onboard the fifth Kalvari-class submarine ‘INS Vagir’ during its commissioning ceremony, at the Naval Dockyard in Mumbai, Monday, Jan. 23, 2023. (PTI Photo/Kunal Patil)

‘Vagir’ means sand shark, which represents stealth and fearlessness, two qualities synonymous with the ethos of a submariner, it said.

How is Vagir Special?

    • Equipped with some of the best sensors in the world, its weapons package include sufficient wire guided torpedoes and sub-surface to surface missiles to neutralise a large enemy fleet, the Navy said.
Mumbai: Mazagon Dock workers onboard the fifth Kalvari-class submarine ‘Vagir’ ahead of its commissioning ceremony, at the Naval base in Mumbai, Friday, Jan. 20, 2023. (PTI Photo/Shashank Parade)
  • The submarine also has the capability of launching marine commandos for special operations, while its powerful diesel engines can quickly charge batteries for a stealth mission, the Navy added.
  • For self defence, it has a state of the art torpedo decoy system, the Navy release added.

Strength of Indian Navy

The Indian Navy is currently operating sixteen diesel-powered submarines, according to reports. The submarine fleet of India is based in two cities: Visakhapatnam on the east coast and Mumbai on the west coast.

Classes of Indian Submarines

Class Type Boats Origin
Arihant class Ballistic missile submarine (SSBN)
  • INS Arihant (S2)
  • INS Arighat (S3)
India
Kalvari class (Scorpène-class) Attack submarine
  • INS Kalvari (S21)
  • INS Khanderi (S22)
  • INS Karanj (S23)
  • INS Vela (S24)
  • INS Vagir (S25)
FranceIndia
Shishumar class (Type 209 submarine) Attack submarine
  • INS Shishumar (S44)
  • INS Shankush (S45)
  • INS Shalki (S46)
  • INS Shankul (S47)
West GermanyIndia
Sindhughosh class (Kilo-class) Attack submarine
  • INS Sindhughosh (S55)
  • INS Sindhuraj (S57)
  • INS Sindhuratna (S59)
  • INS Sindhukesari (S60)
  • INS Sindhukirti (S61)
  • INS Sindhuvijay (S62)
  • INS Sindhurashtra (S65)
Soviet

Union

Russia

An In-depth Look

Sindhughosh-Class

    • According to a report by Nuclear Threat Capability, India currently has eight operational Sindhughosh-class diesel-electric attack submarines.
    • These Kilo-class submarines serve as the backbone of India’s submarine fleet and are gradually being retrofitted to accommodate the Klub/3M-54E Alfa cruise missile system.
    • These submarines are 72.6 metres long, have a beam of 9.9 metres, and can travel at up to 18 knots when submerged.
    • They can stay submerged for approximately 45 days without surfacing. Their weapons systems can launch torpedoes and anti-ship missiles, the report states.

Shishumar-Class

  • India operates four Shishumar-class vessels and these submarines are 65 metres long, have an 8-meter beam, and can travel at speeds of up to 22.5 knots when submerged, the report says.
  • They can stay submerged for up to 50 days without coming to the surface. Torpedoes can be fired from their weapons systems. Since their commissioning, all four Shishumar-class vessels have undergone refits, it adds.

Arihant Class

  • Under its ATV Program, India is expected to build four nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs). INS Arihant, the first vessel in this class, was commissioned in 2014.
  • It is powered by an 83MW enriched uranium-fueled pressurised light-water reactor (PWR). The Arihant-class submarines are 110 metres long with an 11-meter beam and can submerge at speeds of up to 24 knots, the report by NTR states.
  • They can stay submerged for up to 50 days without coming to the surface. Their weapons systems can launch torpedoes as well as submarine-launched ballistic missiles.

Kalvari-Class

  • Under the Project-75 programme, India is expected to build six Kalvari-class diesel-electric attack submarines. In 2017, the first vessel in this class was commissioned.
  • The Kalvari class is based on the Scorpène-class submarines of France. These submarines are 67.5 metres long, have a beam of 6.2 metres, and can travel at up to 20 knots when submerged. They can stay submerged for up to 50 days without coming to the surface. Their weapons systems can launch torpedoes and anti-ship missiles.

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Originally published at www.news18.com

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